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Blast at Italian embassy in Baghdad
An explosion caused by a missile or mortar shell has shaken the Italian embassy in Baghdad, according to Italian RAI public television.
Last Modified: 27 Nov 2003 11:35 GMT
Last week a donkey cart full of rockets was found at the site
An explosion caused by a missile or mortar shell has shaken the Italian embassy in Baghdad, according to Italian RAI public television.

There were no victims in the blast, which struck late on Wednesday, with only material damage to the second floor of the embassy, it said.

The attack, at around 11.30pm (2030 GMT), came two weeks after a truck stuffed with explosives blew up at Nasiriyah in southern Iraq killing 28 people including 19 Italians.

On the day of the Nasiriyah bombing the Italian intelligence service had been warned of a possible attack, but on the embassy.

Donkey carts

Five days ago two homemade rocket launchers mounted on donkey carts were found in streets near the Italian embassy in Baghdad.

The Italian government of Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi is one of US President George Bush's most faithful European allies.

Source:
AFP
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