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Quraya to meet Sharon

The newly-sworn in full-fledged Palestinian government of Ahmad Quraya and his Israeli counterpart Ariel Sharon will hold talks shortly.

Last Modified: 13 Nov 2003 09:46 GMT
The ground has been prepared for Quraya's (R) meeting with Sharon

The newly-sworn in full-fledged Palestinian government of Ahmad Quraya and his Israeli counterpart Ariel Sharon will hold talks shortly.

Sharon will hold talks with Quraya in 10 days, said Israeli Foreign Minister Silvan Shalom in Jerusalem on Thursday.

 

"This meeting between the prime minister (Sharon) and Abu Alaa (Quraya) will take place in 10 days and will follow a series of meetings between other Israeli and Palestinian ministers," Shalom said.

 

Destruction

 

The Israeli army meanwhile destroyed one house and damaged six others during an attack on the Khan Yunis area in southern Gaza, according to Palestinian sources.   

 

A tank unit supported by two helicopters surrounded one house and then issued orders by loudspeaker for the occupants to leave.

  

The soldiers later pulled out of the area, the sources added.

 

Exchange of fire

  

In the West Bank, Israel forces staged an overnight attack in the north eastern town of Tulkarem and a neighbouring refugee camp, Palestinian security sources in the area said.

 

About 40 jeeps and tanks took part in the operation and exchange of fire could be heard, the sources said.

 

The forces pulled out of Tulkarem and the refugee camp on Thursday morning, reported our correspondent.

 

Israeli forces had also lifted the curfew imposed on al-Yamun town in west Jenin, three days after imposing it.

 

The forces had failed to capture Ibrahim Abahra, a Fatah fighter, but had arrested his mother and three brothers, our correspondent said.

Source:
Aljazeera + Agencies
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