[QODLink]
Archive
No proof of Iraqi WMD transfer
The US Central Intelligence Agency has no evidence that former president Saddam Hussein tried to transfer WMD to al-Qaida or any similar organisation, US media have reported.
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2003 11:47 GMT
CIA adviser David Kay's work formed the basis for the findings
The US Central Intelligence Agency has no evidence that former president Saddam Hussein tried to transfer WMD to al-Qaida or any similar organisation, US media have reported.

Citing a military and intelligence expert, the Washington Post revealed its findings on Sunday – printing details from briefings given by David Kay, the CIA adviser who is directing the search for unconventional weapons in Iraq.

Details about the weapons investigation were also released via a report by Anthony Cordesman, a senior fellow at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies.

The newspaper said that, after Kay's briefing, Cordesman wrote: "[There is] no evidence of any Iraqi effort to transfer weapons of mass destruction or weapons to terrorists."
   
No WMD discoveries

In an interim report in October, Kay said that no such weapons had been found in Iraq.

According to the Post, Cordesman noted that Kay said Iraq "did order nuclear equipment from 1999 on, but no evidence of new major facility to use it" while visiting several Iraqi cities from 1 to 12 November.

The article also claims there is no evidence of chemical weapons production either.

However, Cordesman wrote that Kay claims he has located biological work "under cover of a new agricultural facility" that showed "advances in developing dry storable powder forms of botulinum toxin.”

Critics have said the White House exaggerated the threat Iraq posed in order to justify the invasion and occupation of Iraq.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Featured
The organisation is struggling to its relevance without Julian Assange at the helm.
After decades of overfishing, Japan is taking aim at increasing the number of bluefin tuna in the ocean.
Chinese scientists are designing a particle-smashing collider so massive it could encircle a city.
Critics say the government is going full-steam ahead on economic recovery at the expense of human rights.
Spirits are high in Scotland's 'Whisky Capital of the World' with one distillery thirsty for independence.
join our mailing list