Training Iraqi police in Jordan criticised

Plans by US occupation forces to send Iraqi police recruits to Jordan for training have been criticised by a member of Iraq's interim Governing Council.

    US-led authority blames a lack of facilities for instructing police

    Nasir Jadarji

     said on Monday that "huge sums" of money allocated for the training

    programme in Jordan should have stayed in Iraq.

    "I have asked that the police recruits be trained in Iraq not in

    Jordan but the decision was not submitted to the council, we were

    only informed of it by the coalition forces," he said.

    "Iraq should have been the one to take advantage of these huge

    amounts of money and with it could have trained many more recruits,

    as many as 100,000 inside the country."

    Jadarji said this was his personal view but he believed

    other members who sat on the US-installed council shared his

    opinions.

    E

    ight-week

    courses

    Last week, Jordan's King Abdullah II said his

    country would train 30,000 Iraqi police and troops. 

    E

    ight-week

    courses would be held with each one to be attended by 1500 Iraqis,

    he said.

    The US-led occupation a

    uthority said on Friday final arrangements were being made to train

    Iraqi police in Jordan because it did not have enough facilities

    inside Iraq.

    "The new facility will allow us to train an additional 1500

    cadets every four weeks," spokesman Charles Heatley said.

    The first batch of 500 recruits should arrive for the eight-week

    training course by the end of November.

    According to the authority, the course will be taught by occupation forces 

    and Iraqi police, with the aim of graduating 35,000 new police over

    the next two years to add to the 40,000 already on Iraqi streets.

    SOURCE: AFP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Assad to Putin: Thank you for 'saving our country'

    Assad to Putin: Thank you for 'saving our country'

    Russian and Syrian presidents meet to discuss strategy against 'terrorism' and political settlement options.

    Is Saudi Arabia becoming a danger to the region?

    Is Saudi Arabia becoming a danger to the region?

    We talk to US Congressman Ro Khanna about power politics and debate Mohammed bin Salman's new strategy for the Kingdom.

    Gender violence in India: 'Daughters are not a burden'

    Gender violence in India: 'Daughters are not a burden'

    With female foeticide still widespread, one woman tells her story of being mutilated for giving birth to her daughters.