[QODLink]
Archive
Pirate attacks on the increase
Pirate attacks are at an all time high with Indonesian waters accounting for 25% of the total heists, a maritime watchdog said.
Last Modified: 30 Oct 2003 19:51 GMT
Modern day piracy is a far cry from story book swashbucklers
Pirate attacks are at an all time high with Indonesian waters accounting for 25% of the total heists, a maritime watchdog said.

The International Maritime Bureau (IMB) said that in the first nine months of the year 344 attacks or attempted attacks on ships at sea, at anchor or in port were reported worldwide compared to 271 in 2002 and 253 in 2001.

“This is the highest number of attacks for the first nine months of any year since the IMB began compiling statistics in 1991,” Pottengal Mukundan, London-based IMB director said in a statement, AFP reported.

“There is a clear increase in the use of guns and knives in the attacks,” he added. 

Toll rises
  
The number of crew killed increased to 20 as compared to six in 2002. The number of attacks using guns rose to 77 from 49, the London-based IMB said in a report by its Piracy Reporting Centre in Kuala Lumpur.

“This is the highest number of attacks for the first nine months of any year since the IMB began compiling statistics in 1991”

Pottengal Mukundan, Director of IMB 

So far this year 43 crew members are listed as missing.

The IMB said "the increase in violence is of great concern," and identified Indonesia, Bangladesh, Nigeria and the Malacca Straits between Indonesia and Malaysia as trhe prime hunting grounds of modern day brigands.

Indonesian waters were the most buccaneer-prone with 87 incidents in which 85 seafarers were taken hostage and two killed.

Rocket launchers

In one case in August, eight pirates armed with machine guns and a grenade launcher opened fire and boarded the Malaysian registered "Penrider" tanker from a fishing boat.

They sailed the ship into Indonesian waters and took the master, chief engineer and a crewman hostage, leaving the ship to continue its passage.
  
The trio were later released after an undisclosed ransom was paid.
  
Bangladesh was ranked second for piracy with 37 attacks, Nigeria third with 28, while the Malacca Straits, the world’s busiest shipping route, saw 24 attacks.

Source:
AFP
Topics in this article
People
Featured on Al Jazeera
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Featured
President Poroshenko arrives in Washington on Thursday with money and military aid on his mind, analysts say.
Early players in private medicine often focused on volume over quality, turning many Chinese off for-profit care.
Al Jazeera asked people across Scotland what they think about the prospect of splitting from the United Kingdom.
With social media dominating communication among young Americans, taunting is no longer confined to school hours.
Referendum on Scottish independence is the first major election in the UK where 16 and 17-year olds get a vote.
join our mailing list