[QODLink]
Archive
Vaclav Havel gets Gandhi Peace Prize
Former Czech president Vaclav Havel is to receive this year's Gandhi Peace Prize.
Last Modified: 02 Oct 2003 14:08 GMT
Vaclav Havel led the Czech's through turbulent times
Former Czech president Vaclav Havel is to receive this year's Gandhi Peace Prize.

The prize, which includes a citation together with $220,000, is being awarded to Havel for "his outstanding contribution towards world peace and upholding human rights in the most difficult situations."

Previous recipients included former South African President Nelson Mandela and Northern Ireland civil rights leader John Hume.

Havel, who turns 67 on Sunday, was deprived an education by Czechoslovakia's former communist regime due to his wealthy background. He turned to theatre, winning international fame as a playwright.

He served as the Czech president from the fall of communism in 1989 to 2002.

The Gandhi Peace Prize that is given annually is one of India's best known awards and its jury includes the Prime Minister.

It is dedicated to the memory of Mahatma Gandhi. Born 134 years ago, Gandhi led India's non-violent freedom struggle against British rule.

He was assassinated in 1948 by a Hindu fanatic who believed Gandhi was too conciliatory towards the Muslim minority and newly created Pakistan.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Featured on Al Jazeera
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Featured
Anti-government secrecy organisation struggling for relevance without Julian Assange at the helm.
After decades of overfishing, Japan is taking aim at increasing the number of bluefin tuna in the ocean.
Chinese scientists are designing a particle-smashing collider so massive it could encircle a city.
Critics say the government is going full-steam ahead on economic recovery at the expense of human rights.
Spirits are high in Scotland's 'Whisky Capital of the World' with one distillery thirsty for independence.