[QODLink]
Archive
General Abizaid perplexed over WMD
General John Abizaid, tipped to succeed Tommy Franks as the chief of the US Central Command this month end, finds intelligence on Iraq’s alleged weapons of mass destruction “perplexingly incomplete”.
Last Modified: 26 Oct 2003 14:04 GMT

General Abizaid's admission will fuel the debate over Iraqi WMDs

General John Abizaid, tipped to succeed Tommy Franks as the chief of the US Central Command this month end, finds intelligence on Iraq’s alleged weapons of mass destruction “perplexingly incomplete”.

Abizaid told a US Senate hearing on Wednesday that he together with other US commanders expected to come across Iraqi chemical weapons as they neared Baghdad.

But with the expectations bellied, Abizaid admitted that the US intelligence may not have been absolutely correct.

“That we didn’t get it completely right is what I consider to be a fact,” he told the hearing.

The hearing is aimed to confirm his appointment as the head of the Central Command.
 
“The overall intelligence was the most accurate that I have ever seen on the tactical level, probably the best I have ever seen on the operational level, and perplexingly incomplete on the strategic level with regard to weapons of mass destruction,” Abizaid said.

“But it is perplexing to me, senator, that we have not found weapons of mass destruction when the evidence was so pervasive that it would exist,” Abizaid confessed.

But the general still gave a clean chit to US intelligence.

“I firmly believe that there was no distortion of the intelligence,” Abizaid said. “I really believe that the intelligence community did their best to give us their best judgement about what they thought and that’s what happened,” he added.

Abizaid expressed confidence that current efforts in Iraq would expose the deception of Saddam Hussein and lead to the discovery of weapons of mass destruction. But he said it would take time.

Source:
Unspecified
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Weaving and handicrafts are being re-taught to a younger generation of Iraqi Kurds, but not without challenges.
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
Featured
As nuclear age approaches eighth decade, visitors flock to historic bomb craters at New Mexico test sites.
Venezuela's president lacks the charisma and cult of personality maintained by the late Hugo Chavez.
Despite the Geneva deal, anti-government protesters in Ukraine's eastern regions don't intend to leave any time soon.
Since independence, Zimbabwe has faced food shortages, hyperinflation - and several political crises.
After a sit-in protest at Poland's parliament, lawmakers are set to raise government aid to carers of disabled youth.
join our mailing list