Landmark ruling in anti-spam case

A Californian court has fined a US marketing firm $ 2 million for sending out millions of unsolicited mails to internet users.

    Spamming is a nuisance that stalks the Internet

    Attorney General Bill Lockyer brought the case against PW Marketing of Los Angeles County and its owners Paul Willis and Claudia Griffin in 2002 under a 1998 anti-spam law.

    The stiff  verdict, it is hoped, could help to deter spammers from clogging email accounts worldwide by sending out junk emails.

    PW Marketing and Willis and Griffin were charged with sending out millions of emails advertising "how to" guides on spamming and long lists of email addresses.

    Penalty

    The judgment, which Lockyer has said would be the model for future spam injunctions, forbids PW Marketing from sending unsolicited commercial email, accessing computers that belong to other people without their permission and disguising its identity by sending emails that appear to originate from a different address.

    The injunction also forbids Willis and Griffin for 10 years from owning or managing any business that advertises on the internet.

    Under newly amended Californian laws, individuals can sue spammers and collect damages up to $1000 an email.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    The Muslims of South Korea

    The Muslims of South Korea

    The number of Muslims in South Korea is estimated to be around 100,000, including foreigners.

    Gender violence in India: 'Daughters are not a burden'

    Gender violence in India: 'Daughters are not a burden'

    With female foeticide still widespread, one woman tells her story of being mutilated for giving birth to her daughters.

    Zimbabwe: What's happening?

    Zimbabwe: What's happening?

    Situation tense as thousands march in Harare to call for Robert Mugabe's resignation days after military takeover.