[QODLink]
Archive
Morocco bomb suspect is 'French spy'

A French national on trial in Morocco for allegedly leading a Muslim group suspected of the May bombing attacks in Casablanca has told the court he worked for French intelligence.

Last Modified: 08 Sep 2003 14:23 GMT
The May bombings killed 45 people in Casablanca

A French national on trial in Morocco for allegedly leading a Muslim group suspected of the May bombing attacks in Casablanca has told the court he worked for French intelligence.

Pierre Robert told the Rabat court that he infiltrated Muslim groups and carried out investigations on behalf of the French intelligence services, the DST.

"I was contacted at the time of the (football) World Cup in 1998 by the DST to conduct inquiries into Algerian Islamist networks in France, and I did that," said Robert, who faces the death penalty if found guilty.

Robert said that after successfully carrying out his first undercover operation for French intelligence, he was asked by his contact at the DST, whom he named only as "Mr Luc", to investigate "Islamist activities in Belgium."

Robert and his 33 co-accused are charged with criminal conspiracy, conspiracy to undermine state security, premeditated murder and possession of arms and explosives in connection with the attacks in Casablanca.

Huge blasts

On the evening of 16 May, booby-trapped cars exploded outside an international hotel, a Jewish cultural centre and an Italian restaurant. Suicide bombers also detonated themselves at a Spanish club and a Jewish cemetery, all in downtown Casablanca.

Forty-one people died instantly, including 12 presumed bombers. Four more people died of their injuries in the days and weeks that followed, the latest victim being a 34-year-old Moroccan who died on 16 August.

Born in Saint-Etienne, central France, Robert lives in Tangiers with his Moroccan wife and two children.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.