US close to WTO generics deal

A number of World Trade Organisation members are close to securing a deal to ease the supply of essential medicines to poor countries, removing one of the biggest stumbling blocks in the Doha world trade round.

    South Africa's former President Nelson Mandela has been one of the strongest advocates of drug law relaxation

    Negotiators from the US and several developing countries are nearing a compromise on the issue which has divided the WTO for almost two years.

    “We are optimistic of finding a solution,” Fazil Ismail, chief WTO representative of South Africa told the Financial Times.

    Developing countries - four-fifths of the WTO's membership – see the resolution of the medicines dispute, coupled with looser restrictions on farm trade, as a test of rich nations' pledges to make Doha a "development" round.

    If they all accept the plan in time, it will be submitted to a meeting of the WTO's ruling general council next week, where broader support will be sought.

    Boost

    Resolving the dispute would boost next month's meeting of trade ministers from the WTO's 146 members in Cancun, Mexico, which will seek to expedite the Doha round.

    When the Doha round was launched in late 2001, governments pledged to prevent WTO patent-protection rules stopping poor countries from having access to medicines used to treat serious health problems such as HIV/Aids, the FT said.

    The US last year rejected a draft agreement aimed at breaking the deadlock after objections from members of its pharmaceuticals.

    US drug companies argued that compulsory licencing of medicines by poor countries without manufacturing capacity would enable generic drugs producers in countries such as Brazil and India to flood the market with cheap versions of their patented products, the FT reported.

    The compromise would see the US accept last year’s draft agreement.

    Still, as many as 30 developed and developing countries have assured America they would not seek any commercial advantages from the

    relaxation.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Assad to Putin: Thank you for 'saving our country'

    Assad to Putin: Thank you for 'saving our country'

    Russian and Syrian presidents meet to discuss strategy against 'terrorism' and political settlement options.

    Is Saudi Arabia becoming a danger to the region?

    Is Saudi Arabia becoming a danger to the region?

    We talk to US Congressman Ro Khanna about power politics and debate Mohammed bin Salman's new strategy for the Kingdom.

    Gender violence in India: 'Daughters are not a burden'

    Gender violence in India: 'Daughters are not a burden'

    With female foeticide still widespread, one woman tells her story of being mutilated for giving birth to her daughters.