[QODLink]
Archive
Israel plans tax cuts for settlers
Israeli Finance Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is planning tax breaks for settlers in the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip, according to an Israeli newspaper on Monday.
Last Modified: 04 Aug 2003 10:35 GMT
Netanyahu's scheme will encourage settlement growth
Israeli Finance Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is planning tax breaks for settlers in the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip, according to an Israeli newspaper on Monday.

The plan comes weeks after tough cuts to a range of welfare allowances came into effect as part of an 11 billion shekel ($2.5 billion) package of spending cuts aimed at reining in a swelling budget deficit.

Netanyahu plans to give income tax reductions of 13 percent to around 60 settlements defined by the Jewish state as “under threat of terror attack” in return for the support of the right-wing National Union party in passing the economic cuts package in May, according to the daily.

A spokesman for Netanyahu denied there was any such plan.

More settlements

The tax reductions could encourage people to move to settlements.

Under international law all settlements on the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip are illegal. Previous efforts to end the Palestinian-Israeli conflict call for a freeze in settlement activity.

The National Union initially asked Netanyahu to reinstate a seven percent income tax benefit enjoyed by all settlers that was cancelled in the economic plan.

All settlers in the occupied Gaza Strip, along with selected settlements in the West Bank, will enjoy the tax benefit.

Netanyahu is stalling presentation of the plan to the government for fear of public backlash following a protest by single mothers against the social benefit cuts that have grabbed national attention, reported the paper.

Source:
Reuters
Topics in this article
People
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
Chemotherapy is big business, but some US doctors say it could be overused and are pushing for cheaper and better care.
Amid vote audit and horse-trading, politicians of all hues agree a compromise is needed to avoid political instability.
Part of the joint accord aimed at ending the political impasse establishes an independent National Election Commission.
Rights groups say the US prosecution of terrorism cases targets Muslims and are fraught with abuses.
Local painters forgo experimentation to cater to growing number of foreign buyers.
join our mailing list