[QODLink]
Archive
Indonesians are not 'radical Muslims'

Indonesia's Muslims are not radicals and extremists as portrayed by the press, according to the head of the largest Muslim organisation in the country.

Last Modified: 17 Jul 2003 08:26 GMT
Muslim leader says the press is portraying the wrong image of Indonesia

Indonesia's Muslims are not radicals and extremists as portrayed by the press, according to the head of the largest Muslim organisation in the country.

Hasyim Muzadi, chairman of the Nahdlatul Ulama said on Thursday most of the country's Muslims are moderates.

"What is being written in the newspapers are only the radical actions and it seems that actions that are not radical do not meet the (public) taste," Muzadi was quoted as saying by the state Antara news agency.

 

"Media reports did not reflect the truth in Indonesia where there are a lot of Muslims who act moderately and well," the head of the Nahdlatul Ulama, which claims 40 million members, added.

 

Indonesia is the world's largest Muslim-populated nation.

 

Muzadi said radical Muslims could be "counted with the fingers" and religious radicalism can exist anywhere in the world.

 

Tarnished image

 

Many observers agree the Bali bombings last October tarnished the country's image.

More than 200 people were killed in the explosions that ripped through the heart of Bali's tourist centre.

The authorities blamed the Jemaah Islamiyah - which Indonesian police say is now headquartered in the country.

Dozens of its members have been arrested.

The US and other countries have linked the group with the al-Qaeda network of Osama bin Laden and has accused the Jamaah Islamiya of seeking to establish an Islamic state across much of Southeast Asia.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.