The US has 900 military personnel
at Camp Lemonier

The B-52 Stratofortress that might have been involved in the blast landed near forces training at Godoria Range, along the northern coast of the Horn of the African nation, said the statement.

The incident is being investigated. Two people suffered minor injuries and were treated at Camp Lemonier, the headquarters of Washington’s “counter-terrorism” task force in the Horn of Africa.

Four US soldiers would be evacuated from Djibouti on Monday, said military sources.

"That means that they were seriously injured," said a military source who requested anonymity.

Two other servicemen were taken to Bouffard hospital in Djibouti for treatment. Camp Spokesman Captain William Klumpp said that the injured troops were in “stable” condition.

The forces supporting the Combined Joint Task Force were participating in a routine training exercise.

Two CH-53E super Stallion helicopters, which were participating in the exercise, were damaged in the accident.

Military specialists questioned by AFP said that the B-52 bomber might have come from the US base in Diego Garcia since large planes cannot land in Djibouti or Godoria.

Diego Garcia is part of an archipelago in the Indian Ocean belonging to Britain. Its 8000 inhabitants were forced to leave when the island was leased to the US in the 1970's.

Camp Lemonier is a former French Foreign Legion base in Djibouti. US forces have been using it since the 11 September 2001 attacks in the United States.

The joint task force was purportedly set up late last year, as part of efforts to pursue alleged al-Qaeda members in the Horn of Africa and boost the US military presence in the region.