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Government reshuffle in Yemen
Yemen has announced a cabinet reshuffle 20 days after the General People's Congress (GPC) won the majority of seats in parliament.
Last Modified: 18 May 2003 01:07 GMT
Yemen has announced a cabinet reshuffle 20 days after the General People's Congress (GPC) won the majority of seats in parliament.

Saleh's new cabinet
ministers belong to his party

A new government was formed in Yemen on Saturday with no major changes to key ministries.

 

Prime Minister Abdel Qader Bagammal as well as the ministers of foreign affairs, interior, finance, oil, defense and information retained their posts.

 

The cabinet reshuffle came after the outgoing government resigned following last month’s elections. 

 

Like the previous cabinet, all ministers in the new government are members of the GPC that is led by Yemeni President Ali Abdallah Saleh.

 

Saleh appointed Bagammal to head the 35-member cabinet that includes 17 new ministers, including a woman, Amat al-Alem al-Sousouah.

 

Al-Sousouah, who has served as Yemen’s ambassador to Holland, will hold the ministry of state for human rights replacing another woman, Wheeba Far’e al-Fakih.

 

The elections' committee has not yet announced the official final results of the elections that were held on 27 April. But sources had said that at least 250 seats in the parliament went to the ruling GPC. The Islamist opposition Islah Party won at least 46 of the remaining 76 seats.
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